Types of Interviews? (Part 2)

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Remember an interview is not just a one way transaction, rather an opportunity for interaction where interviewer and interviewee alike can make assessments.

The Behavioral Interview
Many companies increasingly rely on behavior interviews since they use your previous behavior to indicate your future performance. In these interviews, employers use standardized methods to mine information relevant to your competency in a particular area or position. Depending upon the responsibilities of the job and the working environment, you might be asked to describe a time that required problem-solving skills, adaptability, leadership, conflict resolution, multi-tasking, initiative or stress management. You will be asked how you dealt with the situations.

The Audition
For some positions, such as computer programmers or trainers, companies want to see you in action before they make their decision. For this reason, they might take you through a simulation or brief exercise in order to evaluate your skills. An audition can be enormously useful to you as well, since it allows you to demonstrate your abilities in interactive ways that are likely familiar to you. The simulations and exercises should also give you a simplified sense of what the job would be like. If you sense that other candidates have an edge on you in terms of experience or other qualifications, requesting an audition can help level the playing field.

The Follow-up Interview
Companies bring candidates back for second and sometimes third or fourth interviews for a number of reasons. Sometimes they just want to confirm that you are the amazing worker they first thought you to be. Sometimes they are having difficulty deciding between a short-list of candidates. Other times, the interviewer’s supervisor or other decision makers in the company want to gain a sense of you before signing a hiring decision.

The second interview could go in a variety of directions, and you must prepare for each of them. When meeting with the same person again, you do not need to be as assertive in your communication of your skills. You can focus on cementing rapport, understanding where the company is going and how your skills mesh with the company vision and culture. Still, the interviewer should view you as the answer to their needs. You might find yourself negotiating a compensation package. Alternatively, you might find that you are starting from the beginning with a new person.

Some tips for managing second interviews:

  • Be confident. Accentuate what you have to offer and your interest in the position.
  • Probe tactfully to discover more information about the internal company dynamics and culture.
  • Walk through the front door with a plan for negotiating a salary.
  • Be prepared for anything: to relax with an employer or to address the company’s qualms about you.

Conclusion:

Be aware that many different techniques are used to access your suitability for a role including Psychometric testing and that it will be most unlikely that any interviewer will rely on a single interview style. In fact it is more likely that an experienced and professional interviewer will use a combination of interview techniques in order to assess your suitability.

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Belinda Chung - Agribusiness Recruiting - Agricultural Appointments

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